Anarchists in the Gulag (and prison and exile)

Bolshevik repression of anarchists after 1917

Archive for the ‘Sources / Links’ Category

History of Anarchist Emigration: Prospects for New Research

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On May 19 2017 a round table on the “History of Anarchist Emigration: Prospects for New Research” will be held at the Solzhenitsyn Centre of Russian Emigré Studies in Moscow.

It looks like an interesting series of reports on Russian anarchists outside of Russia. More details in the attached pdf: History of Russian Emigration

[Thanks to MA]

Written by gulaganarchists

15, May 2017 at 7:16 pm

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Soviet Secret Police Documents from 1941 (Leningrad) [Anarchist leaflets]

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Three documents about handwritten anarchist leaflets in Leningrad, 1941. Thanks to Malcolm Archibald (and Evaldas Balčiūnas).

Read the files: http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/hqc107

Written by gulaganarchists

5, April 2017 at 9:03 am

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Special Report from the NKVD: The arrest of Ivan Sergeyevich Gerasimov, 1st of May 1936

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Thanks to Malcolm Archibald (and Evaldas Balčiūnas) we’re able to report this document, about Ivan Sergeyevich Gerasimov, arrested on the 1st of May 1936 “who was intending to take part in a First of May demonstration with anarchist slogans and a black flag.”

more info at: http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/2rbq0h

 

[nb, updated 5th April with Bio of Gerasimov: Ivan Sergeyevich Gerasimov was born in the Kashinsky district of Tversk province around 1880. From a peasant family, he received only an elementary education. He lived in the town of Kashin, where he worked as a pastry-cook. An anarcho-communist from 1917, he belonged to the Kashin Federation of Anarchists. He was the author of a poem entitled “On the Death of P. A. Kropotkin,” published in the journal Vol’naya zhizn [Free Life] in 1921. [Research by A. V. Dubovik]]

Written by gulaganarchists

2, April 2017 at 4:01 pm

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Two pieces by Dmitry Ivanovich Rublyov

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Two pieces now up up on the Kate Sharpley Library website:

“No anarchist should take … part in this wretched and insane war” A Letter by Saul Yanovsky to Marie Goldsmit in 1915 http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/h70tb1 and
The Russian Anarchist Movement During the First World War http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/vhhp52

Written by gulaganarchists

28, December 2016 at 12:33 pm

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Russian Anarchist letters in Amsterdam – biographies updated

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The details of Russian anarchist whose letters are preserved in the Senya Fleshin (Fléchine) archive at the International Institute of Social History in Amsterdam has been expanded, with information from the researches of A. V. Dubovik primarily, but also V. A. Savchenko, A. L. Nikitin and CIRA. Thanks goes to Malcolm from Black Cat Press for passing them on. See http://katesharpleylibrary.pbwiki.com/Russian+Anarchist+letters+in+Amsterdam

Written by gulaganarchists

9, August 2015 at 11:38 am

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New book: The Revolution is dead! Long live the revolution!

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«Революция умерла! Да здравствует революция!»[The Revolution is dead! Long live the revolution!] – Yury Glushakov

Published in 2015, 176 pp, 12 pp of illustrations, paperback.

hlskCoverimage

This book by the Belorussian historian Yury Glushakov is the first important work describing the formation and development of the anarchist movement of the first quarter of the 20th century on the territory of the regions which now comprise the Republic of Belarus.

Basing himself on a wide range of sources – archival documents from Belarus and Russia, information in the legal and underground press, memoirs of eye-witnesses, and also the rather scanty researches of historians, – the author traces a lively picture of the stormy social-political life in Grodno, Minsk, Mogilev, Vitebsk and Vilna provinces. It was here around 1902 that the first real anarchist organizations of the Russian Empire appeared, along with other revolutionary tendencies. The book shows the important role played by these organizations, activists, and ideologies in the revolution of 1905–1907, in the inter-revolutionary period, and after the fall of tsarism. Soviet power was not accepted by all the anarchists of Belarus, but their organizational resistance was suppressed by the second half of the 1920s.

On the pages of the book pass hundreds, if not thousands of personalities – inhabitants of cities, towns, villages and even aristocratic estates, which were fated to live under conditions of constant violence, war, strikes, lock-outs, pogroms, armed uprisings, expropriations and “Stolypin neckties”. The author investigates in detail the ideological transformations of anarchism and hybrid tendencies such as the Makhaevists or SR-Maximalists during the period when they played an important political role. He analyzes the conditions which allowed the anarchists to attract the masses to their side, and uncovers the reasons why their selfless struggle did not lead to the establishment of an stateless society. Among those reasons were the reliance on militancy, which led to duels between the revolutionaries and the authorities; and also the drastic changes in social and economic circumstances, cutting the ground from under them.

Translated from https://slovosleva.wordpress.com/2015/01/26/hlusakou/

Written by gulaganarchists

5, March 2015 at 10:23 am

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New article: Russian Anarchists in the Labour Movement in the Early 20th Century by Anatoly Dubovik

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In our native historical science the social base of the Russian anarchist movement in the early 20th century is traditionally regarded as being the petite-bourgeoisie. Thus, in works of the Soviet period a typical opinion is that of S. N. Kanyev, who noted that the dominant elements among the Russian anarchists were “the petit-bourgeois peasantry… small proprietors, handicraft workers and artisans, and also part of the intelligentsia”

 

But now we know better! Thanks to author Anatoly Dubovik and translator Malcolm Archibald, you can read this account of the class composition  – and activity – of the Russian anarchist movement from 1900 to the late 1930s on the Kate Sharpley Library website. PDF version: http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/5qfvvq  Also available in plain text http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/9cnqct

Written by gulaganarchists

17, February 2015 at 7:29 pm