Anarchists in the Gulag (and prison and exile)

Bolshevik repression of anarchists after 1917

Posts Tagged ‘Jewish anarchists

Leah Feldman Yiddish letters (updated)

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Two Letters from Leah Feldman, re: relief work for imprisoned and exiled Russian anarchists. The gist of the first one: “F. sends 30 shilling for the fund and a few addresses of needy comrades in Russia and England.” [Rena Fuks-Mansfeld – see http://socialhistory.org/en/news/yiddish-letters-accessible] (both from Folder 88 of the Flechine Archive at the IISG in Amsterdam: http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH00414/Description

122LeahFeldman1931 121LeahFeldman1930

Dedication (?) in Yiddish from: Nitshes filozofye by H Menes-Freind. Varshe : L. Hershauge, 1939. From the Kate Sharpley LibraryDedicationLeahFeldman NietzscheLeahFeldman

Full translations welcome. Done, thanks to Murray Glickman

See http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/280h97
http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/djhc33
http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/wh72d0 (check out the pdfs for neater Yiddish text).LeahFeldmanLetterDated16XII31 LeahFeldmanAMarkofFriendship LeahFeldmanLetterDated15X30

 

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Written by gulaganarchists

6, November 2014 at 8:24 pm

Leah Feldman (on leaving Russia)

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“Thanks to a good friend of Albert Meltzer we can share with you a scan of the original image of Leah Feldman (on leaving Russia) as used in her obituary in KSL: Bulletin of the Kate Sharpley Library.”  See http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/ttf0kr

Leah Feldman, on leaving Russia

Leah Feldman, on leaving Russia

Written by gulaganarchists

10, October 2014 at 10:49 am

Hikaru TANAKA articles on the Anarchist Red Cross…

with one comment

… but they are in Japanese.

“The Anarchist Relief Organizations for the Prisoners and Exiles in Russia -Focusing on the Activity of New York Anarchist Red Cross from 1905 to 1920s” (English title, not in English but you can at least check out the footnotes)

[ロシアで投獄されたアナーキストを救援するための組織とその活動について ~ニューヨークのアナーキスト赤十字を中心に 1905~1920年代~]

is available at:

http://ir.lib.osaka-kyoiku.ac.jp/dspace/handle/123456789/26902

Also, see the abstract for another (seminar paper):

Hikaru TANAKA: Activity of the Anarchist Red Cross from 1905 to 1920: Jewish anarchists crossing borders
We can note that in many cases, people often became anarchists through their migration experiences. Adopting this viewpoint, we analyzed the participating members and actual activities of a certain organization called the Anarchist Red Cross, founded during the Russian Revolution, by the Russian immigrant anarchists in the United States attempting to rescue their fellow countrymen jailed as political prisoners back home.
Consequently, we have come to a conclusion that the general understanding of American anarchists being the uprooted—those who lead a rootless lifestyle—did not necessarily apply to them. In fact, they aspired to maintain a network with the people in their home country, after they were settled.

http://www.euromigration.jp/english/accomplishments/

Written by gulaganarchists

20, August 2014 at 9:25 am

Aron and Fanya Baron, Luba Fagin photo in USA [larger size]

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Thanks to Black Cat Press who passed this on and relatives of Aron Baron who have the original, we can show you a larger image of the Photo of Aron and Fanya Baron, Luba Fagin and anarchist friends in the USA.

Aron Baron is sitting front centre. Sitting to the right of Aron is Fanya, and directly behind Fanya is her anarchist sister Luba Fagin. Anyone else identifiable?

Aron and Fanya Baron, Luba Fagin and anarchist friends in the USA.

Aron and Fanya Baron, Luba Fagin and anarchist friends in the USA. Aron Baron is sitting front centre. Sitting to the right of Aron is Fanya, and directly behind Fanya is her anarchist sister Luba Fagin.

Original post on this: https://gulaganarchists.wordpress.com/2013/07/10/aron-and-fanya-baron-luba-fagin-photo-in-usa/

Written by gulaganarchists

12, February 2014 at 10:36 am

Leah Feldman’s photo album

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Leah Feldman was an anarchist who was active in Warsaw, in the Ukraine with the Makhnovist movement and later in London. An obituary of her by Albert Meltzer is on the Kate Sharpley Library website http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/9cnpsr

 

Here are the pages of Leah’s photo album. Fortunately, Albert went through the pages with Leah and wrote down the names she could remember. If you can help us put more names to faces, or tell their stories, please get in touch.

 

see http://katesharpleylibrary.pbworks.com/w/page/66877419/Leah%20Feldman%27s%20photo%20album

Written by gulaganarchists

11, June 2013 at 7:50 pm

Veger or Weger, Maria

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Schoolteacher: Moscow & Petrograd

In 1921, after the Cheka in the course of a search unearthed books and a few issues of anarchist newspapers – Freedom (London) and Freie Arbeiter Shtimme (New York) – Maria Veger had been jailed in Moscow where she caught scurvy, and she was sentenced to two years’ banishment to Archangel as a “counter-revolutionary”. Despite being struck down by malaria she managed to escape from the camp and mad her way back, using an alias, to Petrograd where, on 3 July 1923, she was arrested along with about forty anarchist militants, one of them Mollie Steimer. After a few weeks in isolation in the GPU prison in Gorkhovaya Street, where she was interrogated daily, she was sentenced to three years banishment to the Solovki Islands. Dispatched by ship to the Islands on 16 September 1923, she was fetched back to the mainland a few days later – the local Cheka alleging that the camps and prisons were over-crowded – and interned in Vologda prison and then in Petrograd. In 1926, having served three years in the Solovki islands and in the Verkhne-Uralsk isolator and mounting several hunger strikes, she was deported to Archangel. When her time was up she was again sentenced to three years’ isolation in Tashkent, where she was by 1929.

Towards the end of the 1930s she was in internal exile in Essentuki (or Yessentuki) in the Caucasus and, following the death of her sister, Tamara, herself an anarchist and the partner of Leonid Y Lebedev, she was entrusted with the care of her son who had been born in Solovki camp in 1924.

After Essentuki was overrun by the Nazis, Maria Veger was murdered as part of the mass murder of Jews in the area between August 1942 and January 1943 (the Shoah by bullet).

Veger (or Weger) Tamara Moiseeva

Tamara Moiseeva Veger walked out on her respectable Jewish family at the age of 19 to join the revolutionary movement.

An anarchist activist like her partner, Leonid Yaklovitch Lebedev, she was arrested in 1922 by the Bolsheviks and interned in the Solovki islands where she gave birth to their son, Leonid in 1924. Following the death of his mother in the late 1930s, young Leonid was handed over to his aunt Maria who was at that point in internal exile in Essentuki (or Yessentuki) in the Caucasus.

From: http://militants-anarchistes.info/spip.php?article6182 and http://militants-anarchistes.info/spip.php?article6200 . Translated by: Paul Sharkey.

 

from http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/k98tr4

Written by gulaganarchists

13, November 2012 at 10:15 pm

David Grigor’evich Polyakov

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Polyakov (Polyakoff) David Grigor’evich (Poliakoff, David) (25.12.1892, Smolensk – 12.9.1942, Oświęcim [Auschwitz], Poland). Anarchist. In 1918 he was a member of the Smolensk Federation of Anarchists. From the beginning of 1919 he worked in various groups of the Confederation of Anarchist Organization of Ukraine “Nabat” and collaborated in putting out the anarchist newspaper La Libre féderation (Lausanne, 1915–1919).

In the early 1920’s he lived in Poland, then emigrated to France. [He lived in the 11th arrondissement of Paris. He worked as a tailor and later as a mechanic.] He was a member of the French “Anarchist Union” as well as Russian and Jewish anarchist groups in Paris. In April 1925 he went illegally to Berlin and took part in organizing the escape of N. I. Makhno from Moabit Prison. He helped Makhno cross the border into Belgium and took him to Paris.

In the 1920’s and 1930’s he was a member of the “Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association (IWMA) for Anarchists and Anarcho-Syndicalists Imprisoned or Exiled in Russia”. As a representative of the Fund he took part in the 4th Congress of the IWA (Madrid, 16-21.6.1931). On the eve of the capture of Paris by German forces in May, 1940, he fled to the west of France, but then had to return to occupied Paris. He refused to wear the yellow Star of David, was arrested in the street, and as a Jew he was deported on 22.6.1942 on Convoy (Transport) No. 3 from the Drancy transit camp to Oświęcim (Auschwitz). Convoy arrived at Auschwitz 24.6.1942. Polyakov had a camp serial number 41050. He was executed by the Nazis in Oświęcim on 12.8.1942.

Archives:

International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam. Alexander Berkman Papers. Inv. no. 53.

Death books from Auschwitz Concentration camp / Państwowe Muzeum Oświęcim-Brzezinka, p. 19856/1942.

Literature:

[Maximov, G. P.] “David Polyakov” / Delo truda – Probuzhdeniye. New York. 1946. October-November, No. 19, p. 25.

Yelensky, B. In the Struggle for Equality: The Story of the Anarchist Red Cross. Chicago: Alexander Berkman Aid Fund, 1958.

Le mémorial de la déportation des juifs de France / Beate et Serge Klarsfeld.— Paris, 1978.

Memorial to the Jews deported from France, 1942-1944: documentation of the deportation of the victims of the Final Solution in France / S. Klarsfeld. Paris: Beate Klarsfeld Foundation, 1983.

Bianco, R., Répertoire des périodiques anarchistes de langue française: un siècle de presse anarchiste d’expression française, 1880-1983. Aix-Marseille, 1987.

Sterbebücher von Auschwitz: Fragmente = Death books from Auschwitz = Ksiegi zgonów z Auschwitz. Deutsche Ausgabe: Berichte. Namensverzeichnis. Annex. Band 1-3 / hrsg.vom Staatlichen Museum Auschwitz-Birkenau. [Red.: JerzyDȩbski]. München: K.G. Saur, 1995.

Skirda, A. Nestor Makhno: Cossack of Freedom (1888-1934). The Civil War and the Struggle for Free Soviets in Ukraine 1917-1921. — Paris: Hromada: 2001.

From: with thanks to Paul Sharkey, David Berry, militants-anarchistes.info, Anatolii Dubovik and Black Cat Press. Translated by: Malcolm Archibald.

[updated 9/2/12]

Taken from http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/h44k6k

 

Updated version:

David Grigor’evich Polyakov

Polyakov (Polyakoff) David Grigor’evich (Poliakoff, David) (25.12.1892, Smolensk – 12.9.1942, Oświęcim [Auschwitz], Poland). Anarchist. In 1918 he was a member of the Smolensk Federation of Anarchists. From the beginning of 1919 he worked in various groups of the Confederation of Anarchist Organization of Ukraine “Nabat” and collaborated in putting out the anarchist newspaper La Libre féderation (Lausanne, 1915–1919). In 1923 Polyakov was arrested in Moscow and sentenced to exile in Turkestan, from there returned to Smolensk, but on the way escaped.

By 1924 he was in Poland, then emigrated to France. [He lived in the 20th and 11th arrondissements of Paris. He worked as a tailor and later as a mechanic.] He was a member of the French “Anarchist Union” as well as Russian and Jewish anarchist groups in Paris. A short time he was in the Unitary General Confederation of Labour (CGTU). In April 1925 he went illegally to Berlin and took part in organizing the escape of N. I. Makhno from Moabit Prison. He helped Makhno cross the border into Belgium and took him to Paris.

After the split the Abroad Organisation of the Russian Anarchist-Communists “Delo Truda” in 1928, he joined Nicolas Lazarévitch and Ida Mett to form the Collective of the Russian Workers Anarchists and Anarcho-Syndicalists (Kollektiv russkikh rabochikh anarkhistov i anarkho-sindikalistov), which published the magazine “Osvobozhdenie Profsoiuzov” (Paris, November 1928).

From November 1930 Polyakov was a member of the “Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association (IWMA) for Anarchists and Anarcho-Syndicalists Imprisoned or Exiled in Russia”; among other, he corresponded with the exiled anarchists A.A. Kolemasov, S.A. Ruvinsky. As a representative of the Fund he took part in the 4th Congress of the IWA (Madrid, 16-21.6.1931).

On the eve of the capture of Paris by German forces in May, 1940, he fled to the west of France, but then had to return to occupied Paris. He refused to wear the yellow Star of David, was arrested in the street, and as a Jew he was deported on 22.6.1942 on Convoy (Transport) No. 3 from the Drancy transit camp to Oświęcim (Auschwitz). Convoy arrived at Auschwitz 24.6.1942. Polyakov had a camp serial number 41050. He was executed by the Nazis in Oświęcim on 12.8.1942.

Archives:

International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam. Alexander Berkman Papers. Inv. no. 53.

International Institute for Social History, Amsterdam, Senya Fléchine Papers, Folder 81.

Jacques Doubinsky to Mollie Steimer and Senya Fléchine, Paris, December 17, 1929, International Institute for Social History, Amsterdam, Senya Fléchine Papers, Folder 87; November 20, 1930, IISG, Senya Fléchine Papers, Folder 87; December 26, 1930, IISG, Senya Fléchine Papers, Folder 87.

Death books from Auschwitz Concentration camp / Państwowe Muzeum Oświęcim-Brzezinka, p. 19856/1942.

Literature:

[Maximov, G. P.] “David Polyakov” / Delo truda – Probuzhdeniye. New York. 1946. October-November, No. 19, p. 25.

Yelensky, B. In the Struggle for Equality: The Story of the Anarchist Red Cross. Chicago: Alexander Berkman Aid Fund, 1958. p.77.

Le mémorial de la déportation des juifs de France / Beate et Serge Klarsfeld.— Paris, 1978.

Memorial to the Jews deported from France, 1942-1944: documentation of the deportation of the victims of the Final Solution in France / S. Klarsfeld. Paris: Beate Klarsfeld Foundation, 1983.

Bianco, R., Répertoire des périodiques anarchistes de langue française: un siècle de presse anarchiste d’expression française, 1880-1983. Aix-Marseille, 1987.

Sterbebücher von Auschwitz: Fragmente = Death books from Auschwitz = Ksiegi zgonów z Auschwitz. Deutsche Ausgabe: Berichte. Namensverzeichnis. Annex. Band 1-3 / hrsg.vom Staatlichen Museum Auschwitz-Birkenau. [Red.: JerzyDȩbski]. München: K.G. Saur, 1995.

Skirda, A. Nestor Makhno: Cossack of Freedom (1888-1934). The Civil War and the Struggle for Free Soviets in Ukraine 1917-1921. — Paris: Hromada: 2001.

[Updated March 2012]

From: with thanks to Paul Sharkey, David Berry, Rolf Dupuy, militants-anarchistes.info, Anatolii Dubovik and Black Cat Press. Translated by: Malcolm Archibald.

Written by gulaganarchists

8, February 2012 at 10:29 am